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Celebrate the Holidays the Italian Way…

December 1, 2017

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Class X03 is celebrating the holidays Italian style.

Christmas season in Italy is traditionally celebrated December 24-January 6, or Christmas Eve through Epiphany. This follows the pagan season of celebrations that started with Saturnalia, a winter solstice festival, and ended with the Roman New Year, the Calends. However there are lots of Christmas things to see during December prior to Christmas, many starting on December 8, the Feast Day of the Immaculate Conception.

La Befana

Italy’s traditional celebration includes the tale of a white-haired witch known as La Befana who arrives on her broomstick during the night of January 5 and fills the stockings with toys and sweets for the good children and lumps of coal for the bad ones.

According to the legend, the night before the Wise Men arrived at the manger they stopped at the shack of an old woman to ask directions. They invited her to come along but she replied that she was too busy. Then a shepherd asked her to join him but again she refused.

Later that night, she saw a great light in the sky and decided to join the Wise Men and the shepherd bearing gifts that had belonged to her child who had died. She got lost and never found the manger.

Now La Befana flies around on her broomstick each year on the 11th night, bringing gifts to children in hopes that she might find the Baby Jesus. Children hang their stockings on the evening of January 5 awaiting the visit of La Befana.

La Befana Festivals

The town of Urbania, in Le Marche region, holds a 4-day festival for La Befana from January 2-6. Children can meet La Befana in La Casa della Befana. This is one of the biggest celebrations for La Befana in Italy.

The Befana races are held in Venice on January 6. Men dressed as La Befana race in boats on the Grand Canal.

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Gobble, Gobble

November 18, 2017

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The Pilgrims: Voyage to Freedom Part 1: The Need for Freedom

PlYMOUTH MA – ITS HISTORY AND PEOPLE

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Our Web Log with Miss Broderick…

November 18, 2017

Miss Broderick’s 373 web site…

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History of New York…

November 17, 2017

Some great webquests… for all to explore… 4th grade Social Studies….

Native American WebquestLonghouse

Exploring Native Americans

Algonquians and Iroquois

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Web Hunt Native American Heritage

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Everything you ever wanted to know about turkeys… and then some..

November 15, 2017

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Turkey History and Lore (Turkey for the Holidays)

Turkey Trivia Quiz

Thanksgiving – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Social Studies…Puerto Rico

November 8, 2017

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Puerto Rico is located in the Caribbean, an island between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, east of the Dominican Republic.

Puerto Rico

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Veteran’s Day

November 3, 2017

Now more than ever we should pay homage to this day.  Rememberance of all those who give their lives so we can live in our great country.

Armistice Day Becomes Veterans Day

World War I officially ended on June 28, 1919, with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles. The actual fighting between the Allies and Germany, however, had ended seven months earlier with the armistice, which went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918. Armistice Day, as November 11 became known, officially became a holiday in the United States in 1926, and a national holiday 12 years later. On June 1, 1954, the name was changed to Veterans Day to honor all U.S. veterans.
In 1968, new legislation changed the national commemoration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. It soon became apparent, however, that November 11 was a date of historic significance to many Americans. Therefore, in 1978 Congress returned the observance to its traditional date.

Tomb of the Unknowns

Official, national ceremonies for Veterans Day center around the Tomb of the Unknowns.
To honor these men, symbolic of all Americans who gave their lives in all wars, an Army honor guard, the 3d U.S. Infantry (The Old Guard), keeps day and night vigil.
At 11 a.m. on November 11, a combined color guard representing all military services executes “Present Arms” at the tomb. The nation’s tribute to its war dead is symbolized by the laying of a presidential wreath and the playing of “Taps.”

Unknown Soldier Identified

On Memorial Day (which honors U.S. service people who died in action) in 1958, two more unidentified American war dead, one from World War II and the other from the Korean War, were buried next the unknown soldier of World War I.
A law was passed in 1973 providing interment of an unknown American from the Vietnam War, but because of the improved technology to identify the dead, it was not until 1984 that an unidentified soldier was buried in the tomb.
In 1998, however, the Vietnam soldier was identified through DNA tests as Michael Blassie, a 24-year-old Air Force pilot who was shot down in May of 1972 near the Cambodian border. His body was disinterred and reburied by his family in St. Louis, Missouri.